Tuesday, May 2, 2017

BAD HABITS THAT YOUR OPTOMETRIST WANTS YOU TO STOP TO SAVE YOUR EYES


Habits are hard to change. Because they’re already part of your routine, you may not even notice that you’re practicing a bad habit. It is, however, your responsibility to be aware of your actions. There are habits that an optometrist in Clayton, NC would implore you to avoid because they are bad for your eyes. These actions may sound harmless, but if you don’t avoid them, you can easily end up with poor eyesight.
Watching TV and Reading at Night
Watching TV at night can strain your eyes because of the rapid changing of light levels. In fact, just staring at any type of screen, including your smartphone, computer, and e-reader, isn’t advisable. They can inflict eyestrain, dryness, redness, and pain. They can also ruin your sleep schedule. Read more from this blog: http://bit.ly/2rKslxo

Wednesday, April 5, 2017

TRUSTED EYE DOCTOR SHARES 4 FOODS THAT HELP YOU ACHIEVE HEALTHIER EYES


You may have heard that carrots are very good for your vision. As the saying goes, “you’ve never seen a rabbit wearing eyeglasses, right?” This is thanks to the presence of beta-carotene, a type of vitamin A, which helps parts of the eye function more efficiently.
Of course, carrots aren’t the only option out there for those who are looking to change their diets and improve the health of their eyes at the same time. There are many other food options out there that are packed with eye health-nutrients. Some of the options your eye doctor may recommend include: Read more from this blog: http://bit.ly/2o56dxK

Tuesday, February 28, 2017

OPTOMETRIST, OPHTHALMOLOGIST AND OPTICIAN: WHAT ARE THE DIFFERENCES?


Optometrists, ophthalmologists and opticians are all involved in safeguarding your eye health, and each have their own way of doing so. Here are the differences between an optometrist, ophthalmologist and an optician, so you can identify who to book your next eye care appointment with.
Different Training and Skills
An optometrist is a qualified doctor. You may go to an optometrist to have an eye exam, receive diagnosis of eye conditions and be prescribed necessary treatments. Read more from this blog: http://bit.ly/2n9B9hA

Sunday, February 19, 2017

GLAUCOMA DETECTION AND TREATMENT AT AN EYE CARE CENTER IN CLAYTON, NC



While there is no proven method of preventing glaucoma, its effects of significant vision damage or blindness can be averted through early detection and treatment. Initial detection can also slow down vision loss due to glaucoma. An eye care center in Clayton, NC can provide a wide array of detection and treatment methods for patients with glaucoma or those at high risk for it. People of African descent or those with diabetes, as well as individuals with a family history of glaucoma are considered high-risk groups.
Detection of Glaucoma
Regular eye checkups can detect glaucoma, as well as prevent subsequent severe eye damage and vision loss. An eye doctor will perform a comprehensive glaucoma exam to check five factors before offering a glaucoma diagnosis. Tonometry assesses the pressure inside the eye. 12 to 22 mm Hg is the range for normal pressure. Read more from this blog. http://bit.ly/2lZ19eS

Thursday, February 16, 2017

AN EYE CARE CENTER IN CLAYTON, NC HELPS PATIENTS MAINTAIN CLEAR VISION



While a reputable optometrist in Clayton, NC can provide a prescription on how to best protect and correct vision problems, it is up to the patient whether to opt for eyeglasses, contact lenses, or undergo eye surgery. The choice is a matter of lifestyle and personal preference.
Your Clarity Vision eye care center in Clayton, NC will discuss the pros and cons of each option to help their patients decide which one they should go for.
Eyeglasses
You might think it is a little old-fashioned but, even with the numerous advances in eye correction technology, wearing eyeglasses is still popular among patients. Eyeglasses are available in different frame styles and colors, and there are many lens variations available on the market. Aspheric, polycarbonate, photochromic, anti-reflective, and progressive are just a few of the most popular corrective lens types available to an eyeglass-wearing patient. Read more from this blog. http://bit.ly/2kwbj6n

Thursday, December 15, 2016

Eye Care Center Discusses Problems That Require a Visit to the Doctor


Many people tend to take their eyesight for granted - not realizing that a small eye problem can quickly turn into an issue that affects their entire vision or even loss of sight. This is why it is crucial that you pay attention to problems that affect the normal functioning of your eyes before they become worse.

Here are some tips from the Clarity Vision Eye Care Center in Clayton, NC that could help you be aware of common eye problems and when to decide to go to an eye doctor.

“My eyes are itchy!”

Most people consider itchy eyes a normal, transitory condition caused by allergies that go as fast and easy as they come. Nevertheless, itchy eyes can have myriad causes, such as infection in your eyes like pink eye. Read more from this blog:
http://bit.ly/2hD7xmw

Tuesday, November 29, 2016

Clayton, NC Optometrist Reveals 4 Foods that are Good for Your Eyes


You may know that carrots are good for your eyes, but do you know of other foods that can also keep your eyesight healthy as you age? A good Clayton, NC optometrist will be the first to tell you, there’s more to eye nutrition than just the beta carotene contained in carrots. Other nutrients, such as vitamin C and E, lutein, omega-3, zinc, and zeaxanthin all play a role in health, and they can be found in the foods listed below.

Fish

Salmon, sardines, tuna and mackerel are cold-water fish types that contain plenty of omega-3 fatty acids that provide structural support to cell membranes that boost eye health and prevent various eye conditions such as dry eyes, macular degeneration and cataracts. If you don’t eat fish, other good omega-3 sources include fish oil supplements and other food supplements that contain flaxseed oil or black currant seed. Read more from this blog.
http://bit.ly/2gxtYM6